Reporting Services 2012

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Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Estrangela.jpgThis post is a follow-up to my presentation on Automating SSRS Deployments Using Built-in SQL Server Tools.

During that presentation, I demonstrated that you can use the Reporting Services web service in a custom application to get a list of your deployed objects from the server.  Using that functionality you’d be able to generate the batch script containing the RS commands which in their turn use the RSS scripts which I’ve demonstrated.

For those who missed the presentation but ended up here nevertheless, you can download the slides and demo code through my other follow-up post.

However, that’s not the only option!

In this post I’ll be using a technique which is one of my favorite methods of saving work.  Instead of typing a lot of code yourself, type just a bit of code to generate the code that you actually want.  Or, in other words and more concrete: today I’ll be using T-SQL to generate the RS commands for the batch file!

I will be querying some SSRS system tables, so take into account that the code may need changes for future versions of SQL Server, but I can confirm that it should work with both SQL Server 2008 and 2012.  SQL Server 2005 probably too but I don’t have that running anymore so can’t test it out.  Don’t hesitate to leave a comment if you can confirm that this will run on 2005.

The database on which you need to run these queries is called ReportServer, or ReportServer$YourInstance if you didn’t install it with the default instance name.

Figuring It All Out

One of the tougher parts of writing these queries was figuring out how the system tables can be linked with each other.  I studied some of the stored procedures and combined that knowledge with what I actually saw as content on my test system.  I’ll first share a couple of generic queries which may prove useful in case you just want to query the tables.  Then I’ll share the queries that will produce the RS statements.

Usually you’re only interested in the objects that belong to your project.  So each of the following queries has a filter to only show the content of my project folder, called Awesome Reports.

List Of Objects Dependent On Data Source

The following query shows a list of all objects that have a data source dependency.

--list of objects dependent on data sources
select
    case C.[Type]
        when 1 then 'Folder'
        when 2 then 'Report'
        when 3 then 'Resource'
        when 4 then 'Linked Report'
        when 5 then 'Data Source'
        when 6 then 'Report Model'
        when 7 then '???' --post comment if you know what 7 means
        when 8 then 'Shared Dataset'
        when 9 then 'Report Part'
    end ObjectType
    , C.Name
    , DS.Name DataSourceName
    , DSET_SRC.Name DatasetExternalDataSourceName
    , PARENT.Path
from dbo.Catalog C
inner join dbo.Catalog PARENT on PARENT.ItemID = C.ParentID
inner join dbo.DataSource DS on C.ItemID = DS.ItemID
left outer join dbo.DataSets DSET on DSET.LinkID = C.ItemID
left outer join dbo.DataSource DSET_SRC on DSET_SRC.ItemID = DSET.ItemID
where C.Type <> 5 --no data sources
    and C.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'
order by c.Type, C.Name

So what does this return on my test system?

List of objects with data source dependency

In the case of a shared dataset, the DataSetDataSource name is what the data source is called inside the shared dataset.  To get to the real name of the data source, we need to join with the dbo.DataSource table through the dbo.DataSets table while using the right key fields.

List Of Datasets With Linked Data Source

The query below can be interesting to generate a list of your datasets with their data source dependency, including their location.

--list of datasets with linked data source
select DSET.Name DatasetName
    , DSET_PARENT.Path DatasetLocation
    , DS.Name DataSourceName
    , DS_PARENT.Path DataSourceLocation
from dbo.DataSets DSET
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_C on DSET_C.ItemID = DSET.LinkID
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_PARENT on DSET_PARENT.ItemID = DSET_C.ParentID
inner join dbo.DataSource DS on DS.ItemID = DSET.ItemID
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_C on DS_C.ItemID = DS.Link
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_PARENT on DS_PARENT.ItemID = DS_C.ParentID
where DSET_C.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'

On my system I get the following result:

List of datasets with their data source dependency

Generating The RS Commands

Using the knowledge we got by examining above queries, we can now build some queries that generate the RS commands.  And here they are:

--generate DeployDataset commands
select '%RS% -i "%SCRIPTLOCATION%\DeployDataset.rss" -s %REPORTSERVER% -l %TIMEOUT% -e %ENDPOINT% -v dataset="'
     + DSET_C.Name + '" -v datasetLocation="' + DSET_PARENT.Path
     + '" -v dataSourceName="' + DS.Name
     + '" -v dataSourceLocation="' + DS_PARENT.Path + '"'
from dbo.DataSets DSET
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_C on DSET_C.ItemID = DSET.LinkID
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_PARENT on DSET_PARENT.ItemID = DSET_C.ParentID
inner join dbo.DataSource DS on DS.ItemID = DSET.ItemID
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_C on DS_C.ItemID = DS.Link
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_PARENT on DS_PARENT.ItemID = DS_C.ParentID
where DSET_C.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'

--generate DeployReport commands
select '%RS% -i "%SCRIPTLOCATION%\DeployReport.rss" -s %REPORTSERVER% -l %TIMEOUT% -e %ENDPOINT% -v name="'
    + C.Name + '" -v folder="' + PARENT.Path + '"'
FROM dbo.Catalog AS C
inner join dbo.Catalog PARENT on PARENT.ItemID = C.ParentID
where C.Type = 2 --report
    and C.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'

--generate LinkReportToDataSource commands
select '%RS% -i "%SCRIPTLOCATION%\LinkReportToDataSource.rss" -s %REPORTSERVER% -l %TIMEOUT% -e %ENDPOINT% -v reportName="'
    + REP.Name + '" -v parent="' + REP_PARENT.Path + '" -v dataSource="'
    + DS.Name + '" -v dataSourceLocation="' + DS_PARENT.Path + '"'
from dbo.Catalog AS REP
inner join dbo.Catalog REP_PARENT on REP_PARENT.ItemID = REP.ParentID
inner join dbo.DataSource DS on REP.ItemID = DS.ItemID
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_C on DS_C.ItemID = DS.Link
inner join dbo.Catalog DS_PARENT on DS_PARENT.ItemID = DS_C.ParentID
where REP.Type = 2 --report
    and REP.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'
order by REP.Name asc, DS.Name asc

--generate LinkReportToDataset commands
SELECT '%RS% -i "%SCRIPTLOCATION%\LinkReportToDataset.rss" -s %REPORTSERVER% -l %TIMEOUT% -e %ENDPOINT% -v reportName="'
    + REP.Name + '" -v reportLocation="' + REP_PARENT.Path + '" -v datasetName="'
    + DSET.Name + '" -v datasetLocation="' + DSET_PARENT.Path + '"'
from dbo.Catalog AS REP
inner join dbo.Catalog REP_PARENT on REP_PARENT.ItemID = REP.ParentID
inner join dbo.DataSets AS DSET ON REP.ItemID = DSET.ItemID
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_C on DSET_C.ItemID = DSET.LinkID
inner join dbo.Catalog DSET_PARENT on DSET_PARENT.ItemID = DSET_C.ParentID
where REP.Path like '/Awesome Reports/%'

And here’s the output:

Generating the RS commands

Conclusion

It may not be a recommended practice to use the Reporting Services system tables, but as long as you’re only reading them and you keep in mind that your code may break in a next version of SQL Server, they can surely be useful!

Have fun!

Valentino.

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