SSIS OLE DB Source, Parameters And Comments: A Dangerous Mix!

Once again I’ve been wasting some time because of a silly bug.  This time it was due to the OLE DB Source component and the way it works with parameters.  If you are in a situation where you know your query is working fine and yet no records are going down the data flow, here’s a possible solution!

Disclaimer: this issue exists up until SQL Server 2008 R2.  Read on for details!

Update: after being advised to do so by several people, including Jamie Thomson, I’ve filed a bug at MS Connect: SSIS OLE DB Source incorrectly returns zero records in combination with parameter and comment

The Situation

I had a Data Flow with an OLE DB Source that uses one parameter, for instance:

select ProductAlternateKey, EnglishProductName
from dbo.DimProduct
--some really smart comment goes here
where Color = ?

I knew the query was working fine because when executed through SSMS and with the question mark replaced with ‘blue’, it would return 28 rows:

28 records in Management Studio

But when executed in BIDS, through either Execute Package or Execute Task, it would return zero records:

Zero records, zilch, nada, niente, none at all!

So I thought something must be going wrong with the package variable that gets passed into the source parameter, somehow.  I’m not going into details on what I tried out in my attempt to get this working, but I can tell you that I started to get really irritated.  My colleague Koen Verbeeck (b|t) can confirm this because I called him over to my desk to help me think! (thanks btw!) Smile

After some further tinkering with the data flow, we had our smart moment of the day and decided to launch SQL Server Profiler to see what BIDS was sending to the server!  I’m not sure if you’re aware of this but BIDS is doing some metadata-related stuff when preparing queries.  As far as I can tell, it also tries to determine the parameter type by running the following query:

 set fmtonly on select Color from  dbo.DimProduct
--some really smart comment goes here where 1=2 set fmtonly off

When creating this statement, it seems to use the whole FROM clause of the original query, including any trailing comments.  It combines that with a SELECT statement that contains the field that gets filtered and it appends " where 1=2 set fmtonly off".

But alas, apparently it’s not aware that lines can be commented out by using a double dash.  So part of its generated statement is commented out.  What it should have done is used some CRLFs, especially in front of the WHERE clause.  But it didn’t.

So, as a result of that, FMTONLY remains on while the SELECT statement gets executed, resulting in zero records!

For those unfamiliar with the FMTONLY setting:

Returns only metadata to the client. Can be used to test the format of the response without actually running the query.

And I can actually confirm what I’m stating here by changing the query to the following:

set fmtonly off;
select ProductAlternateKey, EnglishProductName
from dbo.DimProduct
--some really smart comment goes here
where Color = ?

28 records down the pipe!

We've got data!

But this hack is a little too dirty to put in production.  So what else can we do?  Well, use block-style comments instead and we won’t face the issue!

select ProductAlternateKey, EnglishProductName
from dbo.DimProduct
/* some even smarter comment goes here */
where Color = ?

So, as I mentioned at the start of the post, this behavior can be reproduced using SSIS versions prior to 2012.  What about 2012 then?  Here’s the result of the Data Flow using the first query mentioned above:

SSIS 2012: we've got data, even with the "faulty" query!

Alright, that works better!  Now let’s use Profiler to check what’s going on here.  This is the first statement that gets executed:

exec [sys].sp_describe_undeclared_parameters N'select ProductAlternateKey, EnglishProductName
from dbo.DimProduct
--some really smart comment goes here
where Color = @P1'

Further down, I also see this one:

exec [sys].sp_describe_first_result_set N'select ProductAlternateKey, EnglishProductName
from dbo.DimProduct
--some really smart comment goes here
where Color = @P1',N'@P1 nvarchar(15)',1

It is using an entirely different approach, no longer using the FMTONLY setting!  Hang on, this rings a bell!  Look what the BOL page for SET FMTONLY (2012 version) specifies:

Do not use this feature. This feature has been replaced by sp_describe_first_result_set (Transact-SQL), sp_describe_undeclared_parameters (Transact-SQL), sys.dm_exec_describe_first_result_set (Transact-SQL), and sys.dm_exec_describe_first_result_set_for_object (Transact-SQL).

Cool stuff!

Conclusion

If you’re not on SQL Server 2012 yet, be careful with comments in OLE DB Sources in the SSIS Data Flow!  Ow, and get the SQL Server Profiler off its dusty shelf now and then!

Have fun!

Valentino.

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